Tuesday, August 9, 2016

How to Handwash your 'Babies'

Whenever I 'warn' you about the fact that some yarn requires hand washing I get the same look, that OMG I can't possibly do that look! (Well some of you anyway)

Bear with me as I try to compare hand washing a garment to giving a Baby a bath!



Step 1:

Fill the appropriate tub with warmish water and a few bubbles! (Eucalan or Soak for Garments, Baby Bubbles for Babies!) Bubbles make the water slippery and helps to remove soil, you may want to avoid too many bubbles for Babies as babies wiggle and are slippery when wet!

Step 2:

Remove extra bits of decoration (pins and brooches from garments, clothing from Babies)

Step 3:

Place Baby/Garment in tub, swish around a bit to get wet.

Step 4: This one is the important one!
For garment, totally immerse in water and walk away for 20 minutes! Easy!
For Baby, be sure to keep baby upright and watch like a hawk, do don't leave the room or turn your back on them, gently wash all parts by hand with love and care!

Step 5: After the appropriate amount of time remove Baby/Garment from tub and wrap gently in a towel removing all excess water, do not wring or twist!

Step 6:
 For Garment: Find a nice flat place, with good air circulation and away from small pets!  Smooth carefully into shape, making sure measurements are close to finished garment, stretching to block open, squishing to achieve correct size.

For Baby:  Dress baby in new clothes, snuggle till Baby is tired and place in safe place for a Nap!

Allow both to rest until ready to Play or Wear again!

Well that was Fun!

Enjoy your Babies while they are Babies (because that stage doesn't last very long) If you wash and look after your handmade garments they will be with you a very long time!

See you soon!





4 comments:

Sarah said...

Great analogy! And cute photos of the Baby!

Anonymous said...

Exactly! Let the woolly-washing begin!!

Anne Crozier said...

Brilliant... what exactly had you had to eat or drink before you wrote that?? Love it!!

Michelle Gibb said...

I agree, great analogy. And a great way of making the act of caring for your handknits approachable. Thanks for sharing.